thegetty

thegetty:

Banned Books Week—History Edition

Giordano Bruno revealed ancient secrets of improving memory by writing about the method of loci, also known as the memory palace.

This technique is still used today as a way to memorize vast amounts of information. By “putting away” information into the drawers and rooms of a familiar place in your mind, you can access this info later by mentally “opening” the right drawer. 

Unfortunately, this idea was not accepted during the Roman Inquisition. Bruno was burned at the stake in 1600 and his book was on the Vatican Index of Prohibited Books.

Enjoy a completely digitized copy: De umbris idearum, 1582, Bruno Giordano. The Getty Research Institute

Banned Books Week celebrates the freedom to read. This week we’re sharing examples of books from cultural history that have been attacked, vilified, or otherwise banned.

dreamgener8tion
dreamgener8tion:

Here’s the 2nd song released off the new album. I’ll be releasing a new song each week up until the album release date November 11. Each song will be accompanied by an artists interpretation. Below is yet another breathtaking interpretation by Sudarsana Mohanty. 100% of proceeds for the download of each song will go to a different charity each week. The main character in this weeks song, “The King Of Montana”, is a veteran. Therefore I chose a veterans charity. The Artemis Rising Invisible War Recovery Program is a recovery program for veterans living with MST (Military Sexual Trauma). Learn more here: http://www.notinvisible.org/recovery_program 
20% of service women & 1% of service men have been sexually assaulted while serving. In 2013 12,000 service women & 14,000 service men said they were assaulted. There is only a 4% conviction rate for reported assaults. If you can, help these brave women & men out. Any and all money you pay to download “The King Of Montana” will be donated: https://dreamgeneration.bandcamp.com/track/the-king-of-montana   
- Chris / DG

dreamgener8tion:

Here’s the 2nd song released off the new album. I’ll be releasing a new song each week up until the album release date November 11. Each song will be accompanied by an artists interpretation. Below is yet another breathtaking interpretation by Sudarsana Mohanty. 100% of proceeds for the download of each song will go to a different charity each week. The main character in this weeks song, “The King Of Montana”, is a veteran. Therefore I chose a veterans charity. The Artemis Rising Invisible War Recovery Program is a recovery program for veterans living with MST (Military Sexual Trauma). Learn more here: http://www.notinvisible.org/recovery_program 

20% of service women & 1% of service men have been sexually assaulted while serving. In 2013 12,000 service women & 14,000 service men said they were assaulted. There is only a 4% conviction rate for reported assaults. If you can, help these brave women & men out. Any and all money you pay to download “The King Of Montana” will be donated: https://dreamgeneration.bandcamp.com/track/the-king-of-montana   

- Chris / DG

scientific-women
prairiefunk:

Barbara McClintock by chid0 :
Barbara McClintock, who won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1983 for her discovery of transposable genetic elements. The remarkable thing about her discovery is among other things the fact that she did so as early as the 1940’s. Way before anyone had an idea about molecular structure of DNA. Genetics was an obscure and unfashionable field at that time. Noone really believed her. Until all those famous others like Morgan, Watson, Crick, Pauling etc. made their discoveries - and her work was reestablished.But there is another reason why I chose her, one that is even more important for me. Howard Green, a colleague, wrote this about her after she died in 1992:"Barbara McClintock was a woman who rejected a woman’s life for herself. She began to do it as a small child and never deviated. Her childhood was not a happy one, and perhaps this provided the force, the moral tension that was so strong in her and so necessary for the life she lived. And we must not forget that at the foundation of every creative life there lies a sense of personal inadequacy that energizes the struggle. This sense was strong in Barbara."

prairiefunk:

Barbara McClintock by chid0 :

Barbara McClintock, who won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1983 for her discovery of transposable genetic elements. The remarkable thing about her discovery is among other things the fact that she did so as early as the 1940’s. Way before anyone had an idea about molecular structure of DNA. Genetics was an obscure and unfashionable field at that time. Noone really believed her. Until all those famous others like Morgan, Watson, Crick, Pauling etc. made their discoveries - and her work was reestablished.

But there is another reason why I chose her, one that is even more important for me. Howard Green, a colleague, wrote this about her after she died in 1992:

"Barbara McClintock was a woman who rejected a woman’s life for herself. She began to do it as a small child and never deviated. Her childhood was not a happy one, and perhaps this provided the force, the moral tension that was so strong in her and so necessary for the life she lived. And we must not forget that at the foundation of every creative life there lies a sense of personal inadequacy that energizes the struggle. This sense was strong in Barbara."

battletendencies

battletendencies:

guys net neutrality is so important

since it just got repealed, cable companies now can charge extra for speed for site hosts, which means sites like netflix, youtube or really any site in the world have to pay extra in order to have the maximum speeds for customers

which means:

  1. small…
androphilia

socialjusticekoolaid:

The Ferguson City Council convened for the first time since Mike Brown’s death, and proved that they literally give no fucks about what the community has to say. Added to their vague, paltry proposed reforms, seems real change will have to come in Ferguson via the ballot box. I don’t care where you live folks— let this be a lesson in voting/participating in your local elections and government! #staywoke #farfromover 

androphilia

thepeoplesrecord:

Amazon tribe fights back against illegal loggers, environmental destruction
September 8, 2014

Brazil is the most dangerous place in the world to be an environmentalist. It accounts for about half of all recorded killings of environmental advocates.

And those numbers are going up, globally. As I reported recently for Foreign Policy:

Between 2002 and 2013, at least 908 people were killed because of their environmental advocacy, according to “Deadly Environment,” a new report from the investigative nonprofit Global Witness. That’s an average of at least one environmentalist murdered every week, and in the last four years, the rate of the murders has doubled. In 2012, the deadliest year on record, 147 deaths were recorded, three times more than a decade earlier. “There were almost certainly more cases,” the report says, “but the nature of the problem makes information hard to find, and even harder to verify.”

That incredibly dangerous environment makes what photographer Lunae Parracho documented even more incredible.

Parracho (websiteTwitterFlickr) followed the Ka’apor tribe, an indigenous community in Brazil, as they fought back against illegal loggers.

Ka’apor warriors ventured into the Alto Turiacu territory in the Amazon basin to track down illegal loggers, tie them up, and sabotage their equipment.

They stole their chainsaws and cut the logs so the loggers couldn’t profit from them.

They released the loggers, but only after taking their shoes and clothes, and setting their trucks on fire.

Source